All Day

When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive will explore how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020.This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours.(artwork by Miki Saito)

When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive will explore how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020.This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours.(artwork by Miki Saito)

Living Trusts – Who Needs Them and Why

Peace United Church of Christ Fellowship Hall

A living trust is a flexible estate planning tool. This presentation will cover the terminology, definitions, and benefits of living trusts in a straightforward way.Learn how they are used to provide control over your estate, avoid probate costs, protect your privacy and facilitate the management of your assets if you should become ill or disabled.What’s the difference between a will and a living trust?What is probate? Why do I want to avoid it?How does a living trust protect your assets?Free, but registration is required.Presenters:Dina Hoffman is an estate planning attorney with a passion for helping clients to explore charitable options in their estate plans. A Santa Cruz High School grad, Dina holds degrees from Stanford University and the UC Berkeley Boalt Hall School of Law. Dina has served on many local boards, including Community Foundation Santa Cruz County.Emily Buchbinder is an estate planning attorney who values the personal relationships she builds with her clients. As part of her services, Emily helps her clients to include philanthropy in their plans. She holds degrees from UC Berkeley and Monterey College of Law and also has an MA in taxation. Emily is a Community Foundation board member. She has served on the boards of Women Lawyers of Santa Cruz County and Habitat for Humanity.Questions? Contact Danu Schoeck at [email protected] or 831.662.2063.

“Archival Research as Penance”: The Papers and Library of Hayden V. White

McHenry Library, Special Collections & Archives Reading Room

Drawing on Hayden White’s newly available archive, this exhibit traces various sites of his intellectual work, teaching, and activism. Materials document his foundational role in building UC Santa Cruz’s pathbreaking History of Consciousness program, his powerful challenges to prevailing ideas of historical interpretation, and his part in a landmark legal ruling in favor of the civil rights of students in the United States which he regarded as one of his proudest accomplishments. In mapping the times and spaces where White elaborated his ideas, Archival Research as Penance invites others to think with him. Curated by Christian Alvarado and Patrick King, 2019-2020 Fellows in the Elisabeth Remak-Honnef Center for Archival Research and Training.Special Collections & Archives is grateful to Margaret Brose, whose generous donation of Hayden White’s archive to the University Library has made this exhibit possible.Thanks also go to The Humanities Institute for its support of fellowships in the Elisabeth Remak-Honnef Center for Archival Research and Training.On view through March 20, 2020.Open to the public during Special Collections & Archives Reading Room hours (generally Mon-Fri, 10:00am-Noon and 1:00pm-4:00pm).

Future Garden Art & Science Exhibition

Arboretum

A major art and science project by Newton Harrison and his late wife and lifelong collaborator Helen Mayer Harrison, Future Garden, is now on view at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanic Garden. Internationally renowned eco-artists and UC Santa Cruz emeritus faculty, the Harrisons created a site-specific environmental art installation in the three geodesic domes and the surrounding garden at the Arboretum. Called Future Garden for the Central Coast of California, the installation, which Newton Harrison continues to evolve, transforms the newly refurbished domes at the Arboretum from relics of the past, steeped in 1970s era charm, into carriers of the future in response to the crisis of climate change.The Harrisons worked with scientists at UC Santa Cruz and botanists at the Arboretum, along with other artists, scientists, and visionaries, to create trial gardens within the domes in which native plant species are subjected to the temperatures and water conditions that scientists see for the region in the near future. The aim is to determine which plants are best able to thrive as the region warms and to propagate these species to create the scaffolding for more rapid regeneration of the local ecosystem as climates shift. As the Harrisons explained, the future for the rapidly warming planet lies in finding durable plant species that together create ecosystems that can continue to live and flourish as temperature increases. The geodesic domes of the Arboretum provide the perfect setting for imagining a future in the face of climate change. With their new gleaming white coverings, the domes ... Read More

Global Cafe

Cafe Iveta

Join us for a free cup of coffee and share your cultural background with those from the US and other countries.This month's topic is Love in Other Cultures. How do you express love in your home culture? Do you have questions about dating culture in the US and Abroad? This is a casual event. Feel free to drop in. No RSVP required. Look for the blue tablecloth at the back of Cafe Iveta.---Hosted by Global Programming, a unit of the Division of Global Engagement.

Solitary Garden Public Sculpture and Garden Project

Baskin Art Studios

The Institute of the Arts is Sciences is proud to present the participatory public sculpture and garden project Solitary Garden, by jackie sumell, November 5, 2019- December 6, 2020, located at the Baskin Art Studios.Solitary Garden features a sculpture made following the blueprint of a standard U.S. solitary confinement cell. Around the 6’ x 9’ cell grows a garden of flowers and vegetables, designed by Tim Young, currently incarcerated in San Quentin, and communicated via letters and drawings to the students and volunteers who are planting and tending the garden as his proxies. The intent of the project, as the artist and Tim Young explain, is to "imagine a landscape without prisons."Solitary Garden is part of Barring Freedom, a multi-faceted, 18-month project which includes exhibitions of art, events and workshops, and a multi-day symposium at UC Santa Cruz, “Visualizing Prison Abolition,” October 15-17, 2020. Barring Freedom brings together artists, activists, and scholars to imagine alternatives to our fundamentally flawed criminal justice system and to galvanize a broader public to address the broken promise of freedom and justice for all in the United States.

Center for Cultural Studies Colloquium – Michael Allan, “World Pictures/Global Visions”

Humanities 1 Building, 210

Alongside discussions of worldliness, globalization, and planetarity, the talk will focus on a global network of camera operators working on behalf of the Lumière Brothers film company from 1896-1903. This microhistory of the transnational origins of early cinema will lead to questions about what it means to apprehend the world through the eyes of a camera.Michael Allan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Oregon, where he is also program faculty in Cinema Studies, Arabic, and Middle East Studies. He is the author of In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton, 2016) and serves as editor of Comparative Literature.About the Colloquium SeriesThe Center for Cultural Studies hosts a Wednesday colloquium series featuring work by campus faculty and visitors. These informal sessions consist of a 40-45-minute presentation followed by discussion. We gather at noon, and presentations begin at 12:15. All events are free and open to the public. The Center provides tea, coffee, and cookies. Please bring your own mug.See our newsletter or website for more information about this quarter's speakers and other events of interest on campus.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Action: Learning from LGBTQ + I (SHRM)

Silicon Valley Campus

Join consultant, author, and advocate Lily Zheng as she lays out a path for workplaces to move beyond thinking about diversity, equity & inclusion purely in terms of representation and hiring .Using poignant examples of LGBTQ+ workplace inclusion initiatives happening within organizations across the country as case studies, she will show the value of focusing on equity and inclusion through policy, workplace culture, corporate social responsibility, and transformational leadership in creating the diverse workplaces of the future.OBJECTIVESDifferentiate workplace diversity, equity AND inclusion and articulate the value of all threeUnderstand how equity & inclusion initiatives empower and feed into a diverse workplaceCome away with concrete examples of DE&I in action and the knowledge of how to implement similar initiatives in their own workplacesThis event is hosted by SHRM Northern California and UCSC Silicon Valley Extension.Professional Development Credits (PDCs): 1.5CostMember: $40Non-member: $50$10 UCSC Extension Discount available,Same day registration: +$5Lunch included with registration.SPEAKER BIOLily Zheng is a diversity, equity & inclusion consultant and executive coach who works with organizations to create high-impact and sustainable change. She has worked with clients from educational, nonprofit, and corporate sectors to create customized trainings, steer DE&I strategy, and equip leaders with the knowledge and tools they need to succeed. Her work fuses management science, organizational theory, and grassroots praxis to find hidden solutions to systemic issues and empower anyone to become an effective, tactical changemaker.Lily has published multiple books and writes frequently for publications including the Harvard Business Review, New York Times, and HR Executive on cutting-edge solutions to today's biggest DE&I challenges. ... Read More

2020 Community Studies Field Study Poster Session

Oakes College Academic, 1st and 2nd Floors

The Community Studies B.A. Program proudly presents its annual poster session created by students just back from their six-month, full-time field studies working with social justice organizations from South America to Santa Cruz. Come talk with them about their experiences working for, learning about and analyzing the prospects for social change.

“Free Men” Film Screening

The Nickelodeon Theatre

Free Men (French: Les hommes libres) is a 2011 French film written and directed by Ismaël Ferroukhi, which recounts the largely untold story about the role that Algerian and other North African Muslims in Paris played in the French resistance and as rescuers of Jews during the German occupation (1940–1944). It features two historic figures: Si Kaddour Benghabrit, rector of the Grand Mosque of Paris, and Salim Halali, an Algerian Jewish singer. The film stars Tahar Rahim playing a fictional young Algerian and Michael Lonsdale as the rector.After the film there will be a Q & A with Chris Silver, Assistant Professor in Jewish History and Culture (McGill University) and Esther Lassman (Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, moderated by Alma Heckman, Assistant Professor of History at UC Santa Cruz.Free and open to the public - RSVP appreciated. Seating is first come, first served. Sponsored by the UCSC Neufeld-Levin Chair of Holocaust Studies.Directions and Parking:The Nickelodeon Theatre is located at 210 Lincoln St, Santa Cruz, CA 95060. Click here for directions and parking at the Nickelodeon Theatre.Doors open at 6:30pm and the program begins at 7:00pm.If you have disability-related needs, please contact the The Humanities Institute at [email protected] or call 831-459-1274 by February 7, 2020. Information about the Nick’s accessibility equipment can be found here.

Ray Collett Lecture: Succulent Poaching & Dudleya Conservation

Arboretum, Horticulture II Meeting Hall

In this talk, Stephen McCabe, Emeritus Director of Research of UCSC Arboretum, will focus on recent poaching of the native succulent Dudleya plants from the California coast, as well as mentioning other succulent poaching that is a side effect of the current succulent plant craze. In one bust alone, about $600,000 worth of poached plants were seized. The talk will cover some of the steps people are taking to protect the common and the many rare and endangered species of succulent plants, as well as how to grow responsibly produced plants.Stephen began his conservation work in Yosemite in the 1970s. He has been studying and growing Dudleya since 1983. He retired from the Arboretum after 30 years, working as most employees did there and then, as a jack of all trades, finishing up as Director of Research. He continues to study Dudleya as a researcher with the Environmental Studies Department at UCSC and the Arboretum, while collaborating with other institutions. Stephen brought his collection of Dudleya from SF State to the Arboretum many years ago.Writings include the Dudleya section of The Jepson Manual and articles in a variety of publications.Free community event and free parkingDonations welcomehttps://arboretum.ucsc.edu/education/ray-collett/index.html

Winter 2020 Drop in Figure Drawing

UCSC Art Department Room M-101, M-101

Free Drop-In Draw For the Community Wednesday nights 7pm-9pmNEW LOCATION: UCSC Art Department J-101 Dates: Jan 8, 15, 22, 29, Feb 5, 12, 19, 26, March 4, 11. Drop-In Draw provides a live model and room monitor. There is no formal lesson; the sessions are free and open to the public. ONLY DRY MEDIA ALLOWED. Parking is available at the Arts parking lot using the self-service pay station.https://art.ucsc.edu/news_events/winter-2020-drop-figure-drawing

Antibalas

Moe's Alley 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Afrobeat greats ANTIBALAS return to Moe's Alley in Santa Cruz. DJ Monk Earl supportsThe musical collective known as Antibalas (Spanish for bullet-proof or anti-bullets) was conceived of in Mexico City and formed in Brooklyn New York. The early nucleus of the group was composed of the band's founder Martín Perna and later included several other members (Gabriel Roth, Michael Wagner, Del Stribling aka Binky Griptite, Victor Axelrod, Fernando Bugaloo Velez, Anda Szilagyi) from the Soul Providers / Dap Kings band. performing their first show in May 1998 at St. Nick's Pub in Harlem NY.A few months into the group's existence, Perna and Roth, on a walk through their southside Williamsburg neighborhood, met Amayo, who at the time owned a boutique / kung fu studio / arts space where he sold his own fashion designs, held shows. They invited Amayo, who grew up in Lagos, Nigeria and was fluent in the music of Fela, to see a show in the neighborhood. A few weeks later, they called again to ask him to fill in for a percussionist for a show at the Cooler (NYC) and he joined the band shortly thereafter. Within months he began composing and performing lyrics and assuming the role of the group's lead vocalist / frontman.The nascent group spent its early months rehearsing and composing at Desco 41st street studios and later the first Daptone Studios at Amayo's Afro Spot. Eschewing all commercial venues for the first year, they performed exclusively in alternative spaces in lofts, community markets, parks, art spaces like Sara ... Read More