All Day

Fog Inquiry: Wandering Seminar by Artist Collective Futurefarmers

Various locations and bus stops on campus

Founded in 1995 by Amy Franceschini, Futurefarmers is an international collective of artists and diverse practitioners. Their critically acclaimed, socially engaged, and site specific projects take place in and around art institutions, universities, sailing vessels, farmlands, kitchens, and other community settings. For Fog Inquiry: Wandering Seminar, Futurefarmers has created a series of thematic gatherings with collaborators including including feminist theorist Karen Barad, cosmologist Alexei Leauthaud, eco-sexual artists Annie Sprinkle and Elizabeth Stephens, atmospheric chemist Peter Weiss, theater director Marianne Weems, artist Tristan Duke, and other artists and thinkers. The regional atmospheric phenomena of fog that can pervade the campus serves as the theme for these gatherings, with an emphasis on seeing, sensing, and knowing within uncertain and misty conditions. In the current hazy socio-political climate, Wandering Seminar intends to trouble the atmospheric conditions impacting knowledge production.

When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive will explore how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020.This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours.(artwork by Miki Saito)

Fog Inquiry: Wandering Seminar by Artist Collective Futurefarmers

Various locations and bus stops on campus

Founded in 1995 by Amy Franceschini, Futurefarmers is an international collective of artists and diverse practitioners. Their critically acclaimed, socially engaged, and site specific projects take place in and around art institutions, universities, sailing vessels, farmlands, kitchens, and other community settings. For Fog Inquiry: Wandering Seminar, Futurefarmers has created a series of thematic gatherings with collaborators including including feminist theorist Karen Barad, cosmologist Alexei Leauthaud, eco-sexual artists Annie Sprinkle and Elizabeth Stephens, atmospheric chemist Peter Weiss, theater director Marianne Weems, artist Tristan Duke, and other artists and thinkers. The regional atmospheric phenomena of fog that can pervade the campus serves as the theme for these gatherings, with an emphasis on seeing, sensing, and knowing within uncertain and misty conditions. In the current hazy socio-political climate, Wandering Seminar intends to trouble the atmospheric conditions impacting knowledge production.

When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive will explore how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020.This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours.(artwork by Miki Saito)

Ongoing

The Gladiators Featuring Droop Lion

Moe's Alley 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Jamaican Reggae Legends THE GLADIATORS make a rare stop in Santa Cruz featuring vocal powerhouse Droop Lion. + Blazeen & DJ SpleeceFounded in 1965 by Albert Griffiths, David Webber, and Errol Grandison The Gladiators has released some of the most mythical songs of Jamaican reggae. Their first hit, the single Hello Carol, was released in 1968. In 1976, thanks to their signature at Virgin, the trilogy Trenchtown Mix Up, Proverbial Reggae and Naturality has been distributed all around the world and some of the songs of these albums have become classics of the reggae as Mix Up and Roots Natty Roots.The band has always been very productive and in 2014, The Gladiators had already released more than 40 albums. The lyrics are often militant and the very recognizable vocal harmonies are unquestionably a major part of the successAt first, The Gladiators were a vocal trio. With the departure of the two other singers, Albert Griffiths took the leadership. Clinton Fearon spent a few years by his side but in 1987, he left the band to start a solo career. Beside Albert Griffiths (guitar and lead vocal), the lineup includes Gallimore Sutherland (Rhythm guitar and backing vocals), Clinton Ruffus ( Leadguitar), Vernon Sutherland (keyboards). Ruddlowe Robinson(Backingvocals)In 2004, Albert Griffiths decided to stop touring, and at first, he passed on the torch to his sons Al on vocals and Anthony on drums. Together, they recorded the album Father and Sons in the Anchor studio in Kingston. After a few tours in this lineup, the historic members of The ... Read More

“Archival Research as Penance”: The Papers and Library of Hayden V. White

McHenry Library, Special Collections & Archives Reading Room

Drawing on Hayden White’s newly available archive, this exhibit traces various sites of his intellectual work, teaching, and activism. Materials document his foundational role in building UC Santa Cruz’s pathbreaking History of Consciousness program, his powerful challenges to prevailing ideas of historical interpretation, and his part in a landmark legal ruling in favor of the civil rights of students in the United States which he regarded as one of his proudest accomplishments. In mapping the times and spaces where White elaborated his ideas, Archival Research as Penance invites others to think with him. Curated by Christian Alvarado and Patrick King, 2019-2020 Fellows in the Elisabeth Remak-Honnef Center for Archival Research and Training. Special Collections & Archives is grateful to Margaret Brose, whose generous donation of Hayden White’s archive to the University Library has made this exhibit possible. Thanks also go to The Humanities Institute for its support of fellowships in the Elisabeth Remak-Honnef Center for Archival Research and Training. On view through March 20, 2020. Open to the public during Special Collections & Archives Reading Room hours (generally Mon-Fri, 10:00am-Noon and 1:00pm-4:00pm).

Future Garden Art & Science Exhibition

Arboretum

A major art and science project by Newton Harrison and his late wife and lifelong collaborator Helen Mayer Harrison, Future Garden, is now on view at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanic Garden. Internationally renowned eco-artists and UC Santa Cruz emeritus faculty, the Harrisons created a site-specific environmental art installation in the three geodesic domes and the surrounding garden at the Arboretum. Called Future Garden for the Central Coast of California, the installation, which Newton Harrison continues to evolve, transforms the newly refurbished domes at the Arboretum from relics of the past, steeped in 1970s era charm, into carriers of the future in response to the crisis of climate change. The Harrisons worked with scientists at UC Santa Cruz and botanists at the Arboretum, along with other artists, scientists, and visionaries, to create trial gardens within the domes in which native plant species are subjected to the temperatures and water conditions that scientists see for the region in the near future. The aim is to determine which plants are best able to thrive as the region warms and to propagate these species to create the scaffolding for more rapid regeneration of the local ecosystem as climates shift. As the Harrisons explained, the future for the rapidly warming planet lies in finding durable plant species that together create ecosystems that can continue to live and flourish as temperature increases. The geodesic domes of the Arboretum provide the perfect setting for imagining a future in the face of climate change. With their new gleaming white coverings, the ... Read More

Presidents’ Day Weekend Sale

Gilroy Premium Outlets @ 681 Leavesley Rd, Gilroy, CA 95020

Looking for some great deals for Presidents’ Day? Look no further than the Gilroy Premium Outlets, you will find sales up to 60% off or more!

Mission Strategy Game

144 School St., Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, United States 144 School St

Gather round the table and play a board game set in the 18th century. Spend Spanish real coins and roll the sheep’s knucklebone to determine the fate of your mission. Recommended for ages 8 and older. Free event. For more information, call (831) 425-5849.

Solitary Garden Public Sculpture and Garden Project

Baskin Art Studios

The Institute of the Arts is Sciences is proud to present the participatory public sculpture and garden project Solitary Garden, by jackie sumell, November 5, 2019- December 6, 2020, located at the Baskin Art Studios.Solitary Garden features a sculpture made following the blueprint of a standard U.S. solitary confinement cell. Around the 6’ x 9’ cell grows a garden of flowers and vegetables, designed by Tim Young, currently incarcerated in San Quentin, and communicated via letters and drawings to the students and volunteers who are planting and tending the garden as his proxies. The intent of the project, as the artist and Tim Young explain, is to "imagine a landscape without prisons."Solitary Garden is part of Barring Freedom, a multi-faceted, 18-month project which includes exhibitions of art, events and workshops, and a multi-day symposium at UC Santa Cruz, “Visualizing Prison Abolition,” October 15-17, 2020. Barring Freedom brings together artists, activists, and scholars to imagine alternatives to our fundamentally flawed criminal justice system and to galvanize a broader public to address the broken promise of freedom and justice for all in the United States.