All Day

Saul Villegas: The Norris Center Archives, a photography project

Art student Saul Villegas presents a photography project featuring curated specimens from the collection at UCSC's Kenneth S. Norris Center for Natural History artistically designed to merge art and science. Villegas has received a 2020 Dean's Undergraduate Research Award for his work. "My vision for the Norris Center Archives project is to introduce the audience to the specimen collection by using dynamic digital filters to edit the photographs. By doing so, I engage the viewer with a dialogue through a fictional context of capturing the specimens' physical objectivity in their environment and utilizing art methods to shift the viewer’s perception. Challenging the notion of how we see these specimens in alternative angles from that of scientific illustration creates an opportunity to view them as art instead of taxidermized objects. An important factor in this series was to photograph and design with different lighting situations to make the specimens appear as alive versus dead. I became interested in STEAM (Science,Technology, Engineering, the Arts, Mathematics) last quarter while working on a project that introduced science themes produced artistically to convey a scientific concept. U.S. National Library of Medicine explains, ‘Manipulative visual arts such as sketching, photography, and origami have been proposed as effective cross-training for spatial intelligence.’ By designing this project, the concept of continuing the tradition of taxonomy and the introduction of digitized art cataloging becomes a vital way to gain perspective on our understanding of natural history while remaining creative and innovative using digital editing software—leading to a variety of new ways to conduct analysis." –Saul ... Read More

CLOSED: When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive explores how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020. This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours. (artwork by Miki Saito)

Eduardo Carrillo Scholars, Virtual Group Show 2020

Works by student recipients of the Eduardo Cariillo Scholarship on virtual display. The Eduardo Carrillo Scholarship, established in 1997 in memory of UC Santa Cruz art professor emeritus and famed Chicano muralist Eduardo Carrillo, is awarded to the most talented emerging student-artists in the UCSC Art Department. Since its inception, the scholarship has benefited over 300 students. Link to virtual exhibition here

Irwin 2020: Collective Solitude

The Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery presents IRWIN 2020: Collective Solitude, the 34th annual Irwin Scholarship Award exhibition showcasing the work of a select group of UC Santa Cruz’s most promising young artists. This year's exhibition will be presented virtually through a 3D model of the Sesnon Gallery. Launching on June 3, it will be accessible online 24/7. Viewers are invited to an online reception and award ceremony on June 3, from 6:00-7:00pm with remarks at 6:15pm. Register here for the Zoom link for reception. The 2020 Irwin Scholars are: Aaron Martinez, Anastasia Oleson, Angel Gonzales, Chloe Murr, Dominic Ramirez, Edgar Cruz, Emma McWaid, Jocelyn Lee, Joshua Zupan, Morgan Tomfohr, Natalie Del Castillo, Rodrigo Ramos, and Veriche Blackwell. About the Irwin Scholarship and the Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery As a way of ensuring that others would have the kind of art education that allowed her to flourish in the art community, the late Sue Irwin established the William Hyde And Susan Benteen Irwin Scholarship Fund in 1986 in honor of her husband. The Irwin Scholarship and group show is granted annually to undergraduate UCSC students for proven excellence in the arts.

UCSC Print Sale 2020

The UC Santa Cruz Art Department presents its annual Print Sale—online! View works from our students. Art is available for sale. Enter the print sale website here.

CLOSED: When We Paint Our Masterpiece: The Art of the Grateful Dead Community

McHenry Library, Brittingham Dead Central Gallery, Main Level

This newest exhibit featuring unique materials from the Grateful Dead Archive explores how the members of the band and the global Dead Head community took inspiration from one another in creating an image-rich, worldwide art practice that, like the band’s music, scrambled perceived standards and norms. The creative works presented in When We Paint Our Masterpiece reveal a world full of variety when it comes to design practices, international traditions, visual icons, and art forms. There has been space for all of these patterns and visions in the community of fans and fellow artists that blossomed around the band, and that community of creators continues to thrive today. This exhibit explores the mutual appreciation among fans as well as between fans and the band. On view through 2020. This free exhibit is open to the public during McHenry Library hours. (artwork by Miki Saito)

Eduardo Carrillo Scholars, Virtual Group Show 2020

Works by student recipients of the Eduardo Cariillo Scholarship on virtual display. The Eduardo Carrillo Scholarship, established in 1997 in memory of UC Santa Cruz art professor emeritus and famed Chicano muralist Eduardo Carrillo, is awarded to the most talented emerging student-artists in the UCSC Art Department. Since its inception, the scholarship has benefited over 300 students. Link to virtual exhibition here

Irwin 2020: Collective Solitude

The Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery presents IRWIN 2020: Collective Solitude, the 34th annual Irwin Scholarship Award exhibition showcasing the work of a select group of UC Santa Cruz’s most promising young artists. This year's exhibition will be presented virtually through a 3D model of the Sesnon Gallery. Launching on June 3, it will be accessible online 24/7. Viewers are invited to an online reception and award ceremony on June 3, from 6:00-7:00pm with remarks at 6:15pm. Register here for the Zoom link for reception. The 2020 Irwin Scholars are: Aaron Martinez, Anastasia Oleson, Angel Gonzales, Chloe Murr, Dominic Ramirez, Edgar Cruz, Emma McWaid, Jocelyn Lee, Joshua Zupan, Morgan Tomfohr, Natalie Del Castillo, Rodrigo Ramos, and Veriche Blackwell. About the Irwin Scholarship and the Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery As a way of ensuring that others would have the kind of art education that allowed her to flourish in the art community, the late Sue Irwin established the William Hyde And Susan Benteen Irwin Scholarship Fund in 1986 in honor of her husband. The Irwin Scholarship and group show is granted annually to undergraduate UCSC students for proven excellence in the arts.

Saul Villegas: The Norris Center Archives, a photography project

Art student Saul Villegas presents a photography project featuring curated specimens from the collection at UCSC's Kenneth S. Norris Center for Natural History artistically designed to merge art and science. Villegas has received a 2020 Dean's Undergraduate Research Award for his work. "My vision for the Norris Center Archives project is to introduce the audience to the specimen collection by using dynamic digital filters to edit the photographs. By doing so, I engage the viewer with a dialogue through a fictional context of capturing the specimens' physical objectivity in their environment and utilizing art methods to shift the viewer’s perception. Challenging the notion of how we see these specimens in alternative angles from that of scientific illustration creates an opportunity to view them as art instead of taxidermized objects. An important factor in this series was to photograph and design with different lighting situations to make the specimens appear as alive versus dead. I became interested in STEAM (Science,Technology, Engineering, the Arts, Mathematics) last quarter while working on a project that introduced science themes produced artistically to convey a scientific concept. U.S. National Library of Medicine explains, ‘Manipulative visual arts such as sketching, photography, and origami have been proposed as effective cross-training for spatial intelligence.’ By designing this project, the concept of continuing the tradition of taxonomy and the introduction of digitized art cataloging becomes a vital way to gain perspective on our understanding of natural history while remaining creative and innovative using digital editing software—leading to a variety of new ways to conduct analysis." –Saul ... Read More

UCSC Print Sale 2020

The UC Santa Cruz Art Department presents its annual Print Sale—online! View works from our students. Art is available for sale. Enter the print sale website here.

Ongoing

“Keep Calm and Laugh On” Fundraising Campaign for DNA’s Comedy Lab

To continue building community through laughter, we invite contributions that will enable creative programming in the face of COVID-19. How do we come together as a community when we’re being told to avoid public gatherings? Is it possible to stay connected even while practicing social distancing? Are laughter and entertainment even important right now? (Cue DNA’s bubbie and zadie in the Catskills in the 1950s: “If we didn’t laugh, we’d cry!”)At DNA’s Comedy Lab, we are re-evaluating our mission, “Building community through laughter,” and we invite you to explore with us. The elements of our mission, when held under a microscope, might appear as follows:“BUILDING” After building the local scene for over a decade, bringing stand-up comedy to Santa Cruz County bars, restaurants, coffee shops—even a barber shop on one occasion—plus outdoor stages, festivals, and numerous private parties, DNA and partners found a home in downtown Santa Cruz in the former Riverfront Twin Cinema in March of 2019. With three stages, including the lobby, DNA’s Comedy Lab produced 288 shows in the first year, before closing our doors to prevent the spread of COVID-19, just one week before our first anniversary. Eddie Pepitone loved his audiences at the Lab. He promised, “I’ll come back any time,” and we intend for him to keep that promise. From the sold-out Rob Schneider show, to up-and-comer Emily Catalano (nurtured by DNA over the past decade and recently “killed it” on Conan), DNA’s Comedy Lab has become a hub of activity with a range of comedic presentations. In addition, the ... Read More

Solitary Garden Virtual Tour

Baskin Art Studios

Solitary Garden is the participatory public sculpture and garden project by award-winning artist jackie sumell. Solitary Garden creatively advocates for the end of solitary confinement and mass incarceration in the United States and asks viewers and participants "to imagine a landscape without prisons." Solitary Garden features a sculpture made following the blueprint of a standard U.S. solitary confinement cell. Around the 6’ x 9’ cell grows a garden of flowers and vegetables, designed by Tim Young, currently incarcerated in San Quentin, and communicated via letters and drawings to the students and volunteers who are planting and tending the garden as his proxies. The intent of the project, as the artist and Tim Young explain, is to "imagine a landscape without prisons." The garden continues to grow at UC Santa Cruz, despite current shelter-in-place requirements. Please use the resources below to experience the project and to learn more about the issues it engages. And write Tim: Timothy Young, #F23374, San Quentin State Prison, San Quentin, CA 94974. Experience Solitary Garden online through a short video created by IAS undergraduate interns. (An extended version is HERE.) FURTHER RESOURCES Tim has written letters to the Solitary Garden team at UC Santa Cruz since August 2019. From his first thoughts on undertaking a garden and his ideas on the significance of the plants he's chosen, to recent writings on how COVID-19 has changed the project for him, the powerful letters are online: Tim Young's letters and other writings Solitary Garden is in UC Santa Cruz Magazine: "A Growing Movement" by ... Read More

CLOSED: Future Garden Art & Science Exhibition

Arboretum

A major art and science project by Newton Harrison and his late wife and lifelong collaborator Helen Mayer Harrison, Future Garden, is now on view at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanic Garden. Internationally renowned eco-artists and UC Santa Cruz emeritus faculty, the Harrisons created a site-specific environmental art installation in the three geodesic domes and the surrounding garden at the Arboretum. Called Future Garden for the Central Coast of California, the installation, which Newton Harrison continues to evolve, transforms the newly refurbished domes at the Arboretum from relics of the past, steeped in 1970s era charm, into carriers of the future in response to the crisis of climate change. The Harrisons worked with scientists at UC Santa Cruz and botanists at the Arboretum, along with other artists, scientists, and visionaries, to create trial gardens within the domes in which native plant species are subjected to the temperatures and water conditions that scientists see for the region in the near future. The aim is to determine which plants are best able to thrive as the region warms and to propagate these species to create the scaffolding for more rapid regeneration of the local ecosystem as climates shift. As the Harrisons explained, the future for the rapidly warming planet lies in finding durable plant species that together create ecosystems that can continue to live and flourish as temperature increases. The geodesic domes of the Arboretum provide the perfect setting for imagining a future in the face of climate change. With their new gleaming white coverings, the ... Read More

Victim Advocacy—An Introductory Webinar

Interested in learning more about the rewarding career of a victim advocate? Get an overview of the field and learn about the comprehensive UCSC Silicon Valley Extension Victim Advocacy Certificate Course, designed to train and qualify students to provide assistance to crime victims. The course counts toward the NACP Provisional Credential. This webinar is free and open to anyone interested in this course. Bring your questions for the Q&A. Presenter Stephanie Elio, business director of Center for Legal Studies. CLS partners with UCSC Extension to provide this completely online program.

CLOSED: Solitary Garden Public Sculpture and Garden Project

Baskin Art Studios

The Institute of the Arts is Sciences is proud to present the participatory public sculpture and garden project Solitary Garden, by jackie sumell, November 5, 2019- December 6, 2020, located at the Baskin Art Studios. Solitary Garden features a sculpture made following the blueprint of a standard U.S. solitary confinement cell. Around the 6’ x 9’ cell grows a garden of flowers and vegetables, designed by Tim Young, currently incarcerated in San Quentin, and communicated via letters and drawings to the students and volunteers who are planting and tending the garden as his proxies. The intent of the project, as the artist and Tim Young explain, is to "imagine a landscape without prisons." Solitary Garden is part of Barring Freedom, a multi-faceted, 18-month project which includes exhibitions of art, events and workshops, and a multi-day symposium at UC Santa Cruz, “Visualizing Prison Abolition,” October 15-17, 2020. Barring Freedom brings together artists, activists, and scholars to imagine alternatives to our fundamentally flawed criminal justice system and to galvanize a broader public to address the broken promise of freedom and justice for all in the United States.

Energize Your Job Search

Ignite the spark. Initiate momentum for a successful search. Work should cultivate your energy, not drain your energy. Join career coach Jennifer Smith from The Muse, who will inspire you to change the way you look at your job search. You'll get some tips on evaluating the components of work that promote vital growth and feel energizing. Then see how to craft plans to do more of that. She'll provide the framework to reset boundaries, avoid pitfalls, and ignite action. This is a one-hour online discussion covering four fundamental steps to transform the way you work in the world. Ask your questions when you register to be sure we can get to them. AGENDA STEP 1: Reset your boundaries + mindset. Cultivate the foundation required to initiate momentum and make change stick.STEP 2: Reflect on your career. Evaluate the components of work that promoted vital growth and felt energizing...and craft plans to do more of that!STEP 3: Solidify your goals and reclaim your direction. Craft a heart-based career development plan including critical learning elements: experience, exposure, and education.STEP 4: Reinvigorate your brand. Differentiate yourself. Refresh your professional brand and articulate your value to future employers.Q&AABOUT JOB MARKET INSIGHTS Job Market Insights is a weekly community discussion providing strategies for professional success in this crazy job market. It is hosted by UCSC Silicon Valley Extension, the professional development arm of UC Santa Cruz. DISCOUNTED CAREER COACHING SERVICES UCSC Silicon Valley Extension students and alumni qualify for a 10 percent discount on a suite of career coaching services ... Read More

Women In Tech Forum: FearLESS Global Women

Women In Tech: FearLess Global Women Immigrant and transnational people share key qualities with entrepreneurs: high risk tolerance, the ability to withstand financial freefall, and the will to turn struggles into action and forge a personal path to success. And without immigrants, there would be no Silicon Valley – throughout the 1980s and 90s, the Valley attracted more foreign-born tech talent than any other region in the world, representing 53% of the workforce by the year 2000. We’d argue that that goes double for female immigrants—and even with the hurdles to success set higher still, 40% of immigrant entrepreneurs in the US are women, and 13% of all female-owned companies are run by women who were born outside of the US (source). When women thrive, the economy follows. What does that journey look like from an insider’s perspective? How do foreign-born female entrepreneurs, investors, and business leaders find footing in a competitive business economy like Silicon Valley? How does the experience of immigration shape a woman’s experience in her career path? Join us on June 10th at 2:00PM to meet four amazing women who will share their voyage to and through Silicon Valley, including: Allies and advocates: why you need them and what to look for Access to capital, gender bias, and other challenges Communities and networks—similar concepts, different roles The journey from then to now: unique success stories Guidance for global entrepreneurs Surprises, stumbling blocks, and sage advice for dealing with both Moderator: Connie Guglielmo — Editor in Chief of CNET Speakers: Bá Minuzzi — ... Read More

SEEDS of Something Different: The Pioneering Era and the Rising Counterculture (1960s)

A live and participatory event series featuring readings from the new illustrated book Seeds of Something Different: the Oral History of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Seeds of Something Different: An Oral History of the University of California, Santa Cruz, just published by the UCSC Library’s Regional History Project, features first-person accounts of the campus’s evolution, from the origins of an audacious dream through the sea changes of five decades. More than two hundred narrators and a trove of archival images contribute to this dynamic, nuanced account. Each session will feature co-editors of the book and special guest respondents, including some of UCSC's most beloved faculty and staff. The series is created especially for UCSC alumni, but all are welcome! The first session will focus on the Pioneering Era and the Rising Counterculture (1960s) and will feature the UCSC Library’s Regional History Project SEEDS team, along with guest commentators Frank Zwart and Ed Landesman. Register Here

Bob Weir Wednesdays

Mill Valley 201 S C Ave, Yale

Bob Weir Wednesdays, Apr 29th 2020, 5:00 PM PTLive From The Archivesnugs.tv/free

My Agile Retrospective

Sharing some lifetime lessons with agile Moshe Gotesman, a project manager with two decades of SIlicon Valley experience, has had his share of both bad and good experiences with agile. He has seen the same issues come up time and again, sometimes with dramatic consequences—uneducated management, reluctant team members, clueless product owners, misguided scrum masters, and process extremists. He has also seen great professionals and team members who really get it. And, he has learned from both. In this discussion, Goetesman will review some agile life lessons. Things to stop doingThings to continue doingThings to start doingJoin us in an open, virtual discussion and share your own experiences with best strategies for making Agile really work. Key topics Impediments to agile and Scrum implementationThe human factor in agile implementationWays to succeed in difficult agile environmentsPresenter: Moshe Gotesman, Ph.D., CSM, SAFe, LeSS, PMP, ITIL, has an extensive project management background and teaches Agile Project Management Using Scrum in the UCSC Silicon Valley Extension Project and Program Management Certificate program. Professional Development Units: Earn 2.0 PDUs Registration: Last day for online registration is June 8. Cost is $5 for UCSC Extension students. Co-Hosts: PM Insight Sunnyvale is a program of PMI SIlicon Valley. UCSC SIlicon Valley Extension is co-sponsoring this event.

Vetiver (POSTPONED)

Felton Music Hall 6275 CA 9, Felton

Doors 7pm // Show 8pm // Ages 21+ // $18 Adv & $22 Day of Show ***This is a standing room general admissions show. There will be a limited number of chairs located in the back of the concert hall. Seating will be first come first served. The restaurant will be open for dinner starting at 4pm.(((folkYEAH!))) PresentsVETIVER